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Pressure Cooker Haddock in Creamy Tomato Soup

My Pressure Cooker Haddock in Creamy Tomato Soup is a delicious way celebrate summer’s local fresh harvest! And it’s on the table in less than 10 minutes. (No haddock? No Problem! You can substitute your favorite white fish instead.) For a lower carb version, leave out the potatoes and carrots!

Pressure Cooker Haddock Tomato Soup with Potatoes, Carrots and Kale

Like I was telling you in my Crispy Baked Potato Wedges — most often what inspires me in the kitchen is what we have available fresh local/seasonal and most often from our own garden. This delicious Pressure Cooker Haddock Tomato Soup with Potatoes, Carrots and Kale is the perfect example of how most of our meals come together!

{Pressure Cooker} Haddock in Creamy Tomato Soup

I had beautiful wild caught haddock filets in the freezer that Ray and I were craving (are we the only ones that craves fish??) and I was thinking hard all morning about ways to prepare it for our lunch. Immediately I knew I wanted to make it in the pressure cooker and I was going to use it frozen, but I needed inspired for the rest of the dish.

We went for a walk outside to enjoy the beautiful weather and to pick some of our homegrown tomatoes. I also grabbed some kale, carrots, basil and parsley from the garden too.

My plan was starting to come together. I wanted something warm and savory, but lighter than a traditional stew yet heavier than a soup.

I knew with all these fresh flavors I really couldn’t go wrong!

So, I rounded out my homegrown meal supplies with homemade chicken bone broth that was in the fridge and potato/onion/garlic from our pantry. And I will admit that Ray thought I was a little crazy when I told him everything I put together, since he was the one asking for fish today. Until he got a nose-full of the delicious armoa coming out of the pressure cooker.

Which Pressure Cooker Should you Buy?

I’ve been using a pressure cooker in my kitchen for years, but it wasn’t until I got an electric pressure cooker (multi cooker) did it become an appliance I used almost daily. The drawback to using a stove top pressure cooker is that it required constant supervision. You have to monitor the stove burner temperature to maintain steady pressure by watching a gauge or listening to the rhythm of the pressure gauge’s jiggle/hiss sound.

{Pressure Cooker} Braised Short Ribs - Gluten & Grain-Free, Paleo, Primal, and Healthy Real-Food

An electric pressure cooker (multi cooker) is very similar to a crock pot where you can set it and forget it. Although, I don’t leave home with it running, I can go outside or into another room without worry while it’s safely doing all the cooking.

And if you are worried about safety in regards to the old-wives tails about pressure cookers, rest assured that the new electric pressure cookers (multi cooker) have safety features to make it safe enough for a child to operate!

Not only are the safe, pressure cookers are an affordable to way to get dinner on the table FAST. I recommend THIS electric pressure cookers (multi cooker) .

Pure deliciousness is all that I can say about this Pressure Cooker Creamy Haddock Tomato Soup. Even our niece, Caitlyn who came over to taste test, agreed!

Oh and it’s totally beautiful too!

{Pressure Cooker} Haddock with Potatoes & Kale

Next time your out shopping grab some wild caught fish, a few fresh veggies and make my Pressure Cooker Haddock Tomato Soup!

If you like this recipe, try these next:

Yours in Health,

Hayley Ryczek

Pressure Cooker Haddock Tomato Soup with Potatoes, Carrots and Kale

Pressure Cooker Creamy Haddock Tomato Soup with Potatoes, Carrots and Kale

My Pressure Cooker Creamy Haddock Tomato Soup with Potatoes, Carrots and Kale is a delicious way celebrate summer's local fresh harvest! And it's on the table in less than 10 minutes. (No haddock? No Problem! You can substitute your favorite white fish instead.) For a lower carb version, leave out the potatoes and carrots!
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Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pound wild caught Haddock Filets frozen, preferably - or other white fish
  • 2 tablespoons Ghee butter or coconut oil
  • 1 medium Onion
  • 1 medium peeled & chopped Carrot
  • 1 large red skinned potato, peeled & cubed
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • 2 cups Chicken Bone Broth or water
  • 2 cups Whole Peeled Tomatoes with juice, fresh or canned
  • 1 pinch Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
  • 2 teaspoons Sea Salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Black Pepper
  • 2 cups chopped kale tightly packed
  • 1/2 cup Heavy Cream or coconut cream, if dairy free
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsely, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chopped basil

Instructions

  • In your pressure cooker, lightly sautee onion and garlic in ghee until soft, about 3 minutes.
  • Add chicken stock, cubed carrots and potatoes, chopped herbs and peeled/chopped tomatoes. Bring to a simmer.
  • Layering my frozen haddock filets ontop of everything using my steamer rack insert -- the fish was just barely touching the goodies below but not fully submerged.  I added generous seasoning and pressure cooked it for 6 minutes - then quick depressurized.
  • Carefully remove the steamer insert with the fish. And using a blender or immersion blender, puree part of the broth/veggies to thicken the liquid.
  • Add kale, cream and fish into the thickened broth and allow to sit on the warm function for 5-10 minutes.

Nutrition

Calories: 379kcal | Carbohydrates: 28g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 20g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Cholesterol: 121mg | Sodium: 2059mg | Potassium: 1339mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 6535IU | Vitamin C: 70.7mg | Calcium: 147mg | Iron: 2.9mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @hayley_inthekitchen or tag #hayley_inthekitchen!

 

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9 Comments

    1. All macro calculators use ingredient averages, none are totally accurate and will vary greatly when made in your own personal kitchen, especially with sodium.

      In this particular situation the ingredients with ‘sodium’ calculations that you may want to explore are chicken bone broth, canned tomatoes and, obviously sea salt.

      Store bought chicken broth vs homemade can have vastly different macros.

      Additionally, with sodium, not all ‘salt’ is equal. I can’t stress the importance of natural, mineral rich sea salt for health…. it’s extremely rare to need any dietary salt reduction when eating a diet based on real food using high quality sea salt. Cheap Iodized table salt and packaged, processed foods should be avoided.

      To understand the importance of salt/sodium/minerals this book is amazing! https://amzn.to/3uo7wXu

  1. 5 stars
    I joined your blog just so I could comment on this recipe. It was fantastic! I wish I had thought to get a crusty bread to soak up every last drop, but I did pretty well with just a spoon. The flavors were perfect together. When I added the fish back in, I broke it up into chunks so there was fish in nearly every bite. Thank you for this recipe. It goes in my favorites file.

  2. 5 stars
    This is one of our family’s FAVORITES!!! (our daughter devores it – even the kale -which is unheard of!!)
    So thank you!!!

    One question…do you have the nutritional breakdown for this??

  3. This was DELISH! The family loved it – even my brother who isn’t keen on veggies. I only had half an onion, so supplemented it with a chopped celery stalk and I had a little bit of cabbage that I didn’t know what to do with, so I chopped that up and threw it in too. Substituted arugula for the kale (coz that’s what was in the fridge) and I don’t have a blender either, so just put the broth on saute to boil and added a wee bit of cornstarch to thicken it up, The haddock is a nice, firm fish that didn’t disintegrate. So, so good! Thanks for the wonderful recipe!

  4. Made this today..pretty easy even for a guy! I did mess up the steam part because the fish fell right in the stew. I just picked out the plum tomatoes and blended them and it came out great. Really delicious dish over arborio rice. Made it man sized

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